Tuesday, June 17, 2008

Lynn Lorenz - Ideas? What ideas?

People ask all the time where do you get your ideas for stories from?

Same place as everyone else, I suppose.
News, events in our lives, our families, or fantasies, our fears. I write about what I know and what interests me. Honestly, I know nothing real about vampires and werewolves, although I love to write about them. They don’t exist, and so you can take and leave what you want of the lore that surrounds them. Which is freeing, in a way.

So, I concentrate on the emotional aspects. For me, that’s the real deal.

What makes the characters in my books good, bad, redeemable, destined to be miserable? What are their flaws, their strengths? What do they long for or fear?
What happens when I supply it or take it away?
And how can I use that in a story that will grip my readers, drag them along, until we reach the edge of the cliff?

Then, throw them off.

And always, at the bottom, have a Happily Ever After waiting to catch them.

Where do your ideas come from?

www.lynnlorenz.com
The Mercenary's Tale

Jackson's Pride
Soul Bonds
all at http://www.loose-id.com/

2 comments:

Ginger Simpson said...

Funny you should ask this question. I just posted something on GingersGroup about how the ending of Sarah's Journey came to me as I was falling asleep. I've never written an ending before getting there with my characters, because I'm a 'pantser'. But, despite having second thoughts, I left it as is. There is a reason for it and I can only hope my readers GET it.

Lynn Lorenz said...

I'm a panster too, and I frequently write scenes out of order. When they come to me I just write them down and leave room around them.
I've written fight scenes, endings and love scenes that way.
When the muse moves me, I go.

Try it when you're stuck and can't come up with the next scene. It'll get your juices flowing and you'll be able to fill in easier.

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