Friday, June 17, 2011

Welcome Juliet Waldron

 Ancient Aliens

In the story of Jason and the Golden Fleece, the Sorceress Medea knows how to defeat the red-hot man of metal who guards an island day and night. She knows a “magical song” which will make him stand still and allow her to safely touch him.  When he is quieted by her singing, she carefully removes a small screw in the back of his foot. Red-hot liquid rushes out, boiling and searing the ground. When it stops, he falls over, “dead,” and the adventurers can join her on the forbidden island.

I’ve never been big on “Ancient Aliens,”, but you’ve got to wonder how a Bronze Age society came up with this "crazy" story, which seems to include a fair description of hydraulic fluid inside a robot—who, being a machine, would certainly be an ever-vigilant guardian. The “song” is familiar to anyone who has heard digital signals—which are commands transmitted by the linking of notes or "tones" with numbers. Twenty years ago, these could be heard over your telephone. Today they surround us, zinging through wi-fi and cell phones in every direction and telling our machines what to connect to and what command to perform.

At any rate, whenever I imagine Medea and her magical song these days, I find the story far more hair-raising when I first read about it during childhood. It really seems as if "they" have been here before, messing with our poor, Bronze Age minds! In the 'fifties, the man of metal seemed a fantasy, something far away and practically impossible, but here in the 21st Century he’s become

Here at the LG blog we have a keen interest in robots, so while ... | http://www.lgblog.co.uk/2010/1...

 a lot realer to all of us.



1 comment:

Penny Ehrenkranz said...

Ginger, thanks for sharing this.

I also want to let you know I've awarded your blog the Irresistibly Sweet Blog Award. Please stop by my blog tomorrow and pick it up. http://pennylockwoodehrenkranz.blogspot.com

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